We use cookies, similar technologies and tracking services

This website uses cookies, similar technologies and tracking services (hereinafter referred to as “Cookies”). These Cookies help to display our website, improve it based on your user behavior (e.g., via Salesforce Pardot) and present content aligned with your interests (e.g., LinkedIn Insights, Google Ads). We require your consent to use Cookies. Additionally, we incorporate content from third-party providers (e.g., Microsoft Azure for single sign-on authentication), which could involve transferring your data to the United States, a non-secure third country. By clicking Accept All, you consent to the use of non-essential Cookies and to your data being transferred to third countries. Clicking Refuse enables you to reject the use of non-essential Cookies. Please select which Cookies we may use under Details. More information, particularly about your rights as a data subject, is available under Details or in our Privacy Policy .

Details

Refuse

Accept

Below, you can activate/deactivate the individual technologies that are used on this website.

Accept All

Essential

These Cookies make a website usable by providing basic functions such as page navigation, language settings, Cookie preferences and access to protected areas of the website. Cookies in this category additionally ensure that the website complies with the applicable legal requirements and security standards. Owing to the essential nature of these Cookies, you cannot prevent their use on our website. Details about these Cookies are available under More Information.

Functionality and personalization

These Cookies collect information about your habits when using our web pages and help us to enhance your user experience by tailoring the functions and attractiveness of our web pages based on your previous visits, location and browser settings. They also enable access to integrated third-party tools on our website (e.g., Microsoft Azure for single sign-on authentication). This can involve transferring your data to the United States, a non-secure third country. If you refuse these Cookies, you might not be able to access the full functionality of the website. Details about the tools we use are available under More Information.

Analysis

These Cookies are used to compile basic usage and user statistics based on how our web pages are used. If you accept these Cookies, you simultaneously consent to your data being processed and transmitted to the United States by services such as Salesforce Pardot. Details about the tools we use are available under More Information.

Marketing and social media

These Cookies help third-party sources collect information about how you share content from our website on social media or provide analytical data about your user behavior when you move between social media platforms or between our social media campaigns and our web pages (e.g., LinkedIn Insights). Marketing Cookies from third-party sources also help us measure the effectiveness of our advertising on other websites (e.g., Google Ads). We use these Cookies to optimize how we deliver our content to you. The third-party sources and social media platforms we use can transfer your data to the United States, a non-secure third country. If you accept these Cookies, you simultaneously consent to your data being transferred and processed as described above. Details about the tools we use and our social media presence are available under More Information.

More information

Save Settings

Jochen Weyrauch driving a Tesla

On the road with Dr. Jochen Weyrauch

We joined Dr. Jochen Weyrauch on his way back from HOMAG in Schopfloch to the Bietigheim-Bissingen headquarters. We came equipped with: a dictaphone, a camera – and plenty of questions. We asked the new CEO these questions on the one-and-a-half-hour drive.

 

Does he miss the engine sound in his electric car? And how sustainable is Jochen Weyrauch’s lifestyle outside of work? Answers to these and further personal questions can be found in our video. In the second part of our interview, you will learn how important the topic of sustainability is at the Dürr Group and how the CEO wants to promote future tasks such as digitalization and the transformation of the working environment.

We are about to leave the Group’s subsidiary HOMAG in Schopfloch and drive back to the Bietigheim-Bissingen headquarters in your electric car. Yours will be one of the few electric vehicles on the freeway. When is this likely to change?

JW: The breakthrough of electromobility is already in the cards today. In Germany, we are seeing record levels of new registrations for electric vehicles every year. I expect that by 2030, around a third of all new vehicles will have an electric drive. And this shift is not just happening in Germany, but worldwide. Including China, where development is much further along that road than it is here.

How will this affect Dürr’s products and services?

JW: E-mobility is driving our business because numerous start-ups from Europe, Asia, and the United States are surging into this market. We are providing machines and systems for their factories. Furthermore, we are supporting established OEMs who are converting their production facilities. Electric cars are heavier, which means conventional manufacturing systems are often not suitable for them. But e-mobility also offers us the opportunity to enter new markets. To give you an example: We provide coating systems for electrodes, which are installed in battery cells. In addition, the Dürr Group, through Teamtechnik, leads the market in the testing of electric drives.

 

Weyrauch glances at the cockpit, starts the car, and touches the large touchscreen in the central console. We can hear the voice of the soul singer Alicia Keys. He likes her music, enjoys listening to her while driving, and wants to go to one of her concerts as soon as possible. Depending on his mood, he will sometimes switch to rap or classical music. The right music enhances the driving experience. He does turn down the volume for our conversation, though.

An electrifying job: Jochen Weyrauch, who holds a PhD in industrial engineering, has been CEO of the Dürr Group since January 2022 and is constantly on the move. To travel as sustainably as possible, he has chosen an electrically powered company car.

When it comes to sustainability, there is huge potential to be leveraged in industry.

Dr. Jochen Weyrauch, CEO of Dürr AG

The esthetics of a vehicle are underlined by the right paint finish. Is this the same for electric cars?

JW: We have seen that the paint finish is becoming more important due to the success of electromobility. Since electric drives shape the character of a car less than the various internal combustion engines, manufacturers are trying to differentiate their vehicles through the type of color by offering, for example, cars with a two-tone design. This places higher demands on the painting technology, which has a positive impact on our business.

In automotive manufacturing, paint shops were long considered energy guzzlers. To what extent are manufacturers prepared to make their production more sustainable?

JW: When it comes to sustainability, there is still huge potential to be leveraged in industry. Around 200 automotive factories in Europe are still removing overspray in the paint booth using the conventional wet process, which consumes a lot of energy and water. And yet it is possible to reduce the CO2 emissions of a medium-sized painting line by around 8,000 tons per year using our modern dry separation system. For ovens or exhaust-air purification systems, we also offer alternatives that are significantly more economical and eco-friendlier. How much these innovations continue to take hold depends on how far the automotive industry drives its sustainability-related investments.

The car in which we are sitting still needs to be steered manually. When will automated driving become the norm?

JW: We're looking at a good ten years before that happens. The development effort for the automotive industry is extremely high, plus the legally required certification processes also take a lot of time and effort. But we are already seeing some promising approaches.

 

With a smile, the CEO pulls a lever and shortly afterwards he is only lightly touching the steering wheel. The autopilot keeps the car in the lane. This is only permitted when the driver can intervene at any time. It is a precursor to automated driving — something that even a motor sport enthusiast like Weyrauch appears to enjoy.

The CEO knows the way, but he still likes to use his sat nav.

Taking the right exit: The destination of the journey is Bietigheim-Bissingen.

The Dürr Group itself drives technological progress in a number of areas. What are the most important innovations right now?

JW: We are breaking with the rigid structure of painting systems and are making the processes of carmakers more flexible with the help of modular systems. A painting line where car bodies move along one after the other could soon become a thing of the past. In the field of timber construction, our subsidiary HOMAG is a great innovator. This is where we are developing systems to push industrialized timber house construction — not only for single-family houses. Multi-story buildings or even high-rise buildings can also be erected in this way.

 

We are on the A81 freeway, just outside Böblingen. Suddenly, we can hear a beeping sound and the car breaks automatically. The electronic system has intervened. The distance to the car ahead was too short — at least according to the software.

 

Digital tools are increasingly shaping cooperation within the workforce. How does everyone cope with this?

JW: We will see a transformation in this regard within the next few years. Nobody should be left behind on this journey. We are therefore offering training programs, which help employees to familiarize themselves with new and useful digital tools. They will make mobile or hybrid working easier. These modern ways of working are especially popular with the younger generation. That’s an important point given the demographic shift. We are already competing for the best talent in many areas — and so far we have been successful.

Automotive industry, woodworking, medical technology — the Dürr Group is positioning itself more and more broadly. Why?

JW: Aside from the highly cyclical automotive business, we are developing further mainstays that give us stability. By adopting this approach, we have already made great strides. Last year, for the first time, our sales were higher in the non-automotive sector than in our traditional business. We have noticed that the capital market values this step.

Jochen Weyrauch (right) talks to Heimo Fischer.

Supply shortages are currently impacting numerous companies. How is your company preparing for this?

JW: Over the past few years, the business world has paid too little attention to supply chain security. Now this topic is at the forefront every day, not least because of Russia’s devastating attacks on Ukraine. Supply shortages no longer affect only semi-conductors but also steel and other materials that nobody ever thought could be subject to shortages. Having coped relatively well at first, we are now also feeling the effects of the ongoing bottlenecks. Our purchasing department, for which we developed a more strategic approach last year, is working closely with our engineers to find solutions together if any parts are missing.

 

After more than 90 kilometers, we have reached our destination. There is a charging station outside the Bietigheim-Bissingen headquarters. This is where Weyrauch parks his car — so when he leaves work, he can carry on driving with a fully charged battery.

 

 

More from "Prepared for tomorrow"